omgfabulous:

rollership:

asylum-art: Soundsuits’ of Artist & Fashion Designer Nick Cave

"Nick Cave (born 1959 in central Missouri, USA) is an American fabric sculptor, dancer, and performance artist. He is best known for his Soundsuits: wearable fabric sculptures that are bright, whimsical, and other-worldly."
“Cave’s first Soundsuit was made of twigs. Other typical materials include dyed human hair, sisal, plastic buttons, beads, sequins, and feathers. His work is a crazy mix of media—these bunny suits are made of human hair, and others are montages of vintage finds, beads, buttons and old style needle crafts like crocheting and macrame. The finished pieces bear some resemblance to African ceremonial costumes and masks. His suits are presented for public viewing as static sculptures, but also through live performance, video, and photograph

…this, though awesome in their own right, has left me very confused about what the bad seeds have been up to lately

asymptomatics:

Guys, if any of you have any triggers you want me to tag please tell me. 

  • I don’t care if it’s embarrassing
  • That’s why anon exists
  • I will literally tag whatever triggers you have
  • Especially if it’s a phobia 
mancomics:

Spotted in Ft Myers. Was going about 50 like that with it tipping at one point.

mancomics:

Spotted in Ft Myers. Was going about 50 like that with it tipping at one point.

trans-par-en-cy:

xx transparent xx

trans-par-en-cy:

xx transparent xx

autieblesam:

[Image is a poster explaining briefly the origin and meaning of green, yellow, and red interaction signal badges, referred to above as Color Communication Badges.]
deducecanoe:

justsjwthings:

oldamongdreams:

greencarnations:

CAN WE DO THESE AT CONS

SECONDED.

if youre not autistic or suffer from an actual disorder, dont use these. its not cute.

er… you know a lot of autistic people go to conventions, right? And people with social anxiety disorders and panic disorders? Shit if I could get away with using this at work I would. 

Hello there, justsjwthings.
I would like to introduce myself.  I refer to myself as Sam Thomas, though my legal name and how a lot of people know me is Matthew.  I am officially diagnosed autistic.
Over one week in June 2013 (last summer), I was in Washington, DC for an autism conference called the Autism Campus Inclusion (ACI) summer leadership program run by the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network for autistic college students.
If you have any question as to the truth of this, I would like to direct your attention to this YouTube video that ASAN produced promoting the above-mentioned conference.  I appear as the first person in the video and you can find more images of my face on my blog.
At this conference, not only did we use these communication badges pictured above, but we actually had the opportunity to meet Jim Sinclair, the inventor of these badges.
During the part of the conference in which Jim Sinclair gave us a history of Autism Network International (ANI)—which they were a co-founder of—they talked to us about the establishment of this particular piece of assistive technology.  Basically, it was a simple idea that seemed to fit a need and quickly became very popular among many autistic spaces for it’s practicality and ease of use.
The conference it originated from is called Autreat and is held annually by ANI. This is an autism conference that accepts Autistics and Cousins (ACs)—that is, anyone diagnosed or otherwise self-identifying with any disorder autistic or similar that may share a number of autistic traits.
There was a need.  The need was met.  This is how we can safely assume most technology either emerges or becomes popular.
We also talked about something called Universal Design and the Curb-Cutter Effect.  The Curb-Cutter Effect is when something to fit a specific need is found to create convenience in a broader area than intended.  Curb cuts allowing for wheelchair accessibility to sidewalks proved to also be convenient to anyone who may have trouble with steps or even simply a mother with a baby stroller or maybe a child with a wagon.  This is a desirable outcome with disability rights advocacy as creating convenience for non-disabled people often makes the assistive technology easier to advocate for.
In this sense, these colored communication badges could serve that Curb-Cutter effect.  Not only would this be perfectly acceptable for non-disabled people to use for convenience, but would also help to increase their effectiveness and convenience for those of us who need them.  Here are a few examples:
Increased popularity makes the colored communication badges more easily recognizable to the general public, making them as effective outside the above-mentioned autism conferences as inside.
Increase in demand would create increase in supply and availability, likely making these available to pretty much anyone and even being included with, say, the name tags you are required to wear at most cons.
In addition to these helping people recognize the communication state of the wearer, the wearer will be able to recognize whom they can feel more comfortable to approach.
Increased popularity would make these badges more acceptable for public use and less alienating to those who would wear them frequently.
This is not something that we are completely incapable of surviving without; this is something that was convenient and made our lives a lot easier.  If that can be easily shared with the general public, then what purpose does it serve not to share it?
Thank you for reading.

autieblesam:

[Image is a poster explaining briefly the origin and meaning of green, yellow, and red interaction signal badges, referred to above as Color Communication Badges.]

deducecanoe:

justsjwthings:

oldamongdreams:

greencarnations:

CAN WE DO THESE AT CONS

SECONDED.

if youre not autistic or suffer from an actual disorder, dont use these. its not cute.

er… you know a lot of autistic people go to conventions, right? And people with social anxiety disorders and panic disorders? Shit if I could get away with using this at work I would. 

Hello there, justsjwthings.

I would like to introduce myself.  I refer to myself as Sam Thomas, though my legal name and how a lot of people know me is Matthew.  I am officially diagnosed autistic.

Over one week in June 2013 (last summer), I was in Washington, DC for an autism conference called the Autism Campus Inclusion (ACI) summer leadership program run by the Autistic Self-Advocacy Network for autistic college students.

If you have any question as to the truth of this, I would like to direct your attention to this YouTube video that ASAN produced promoting the above-mentioned conference.  I appear as the first person in the video and you can find more images of my face on my blog.

At this conference, not only did we use these communication badges pictured above, but we actually had the opportunity to meet Jim Sinclair, the inventor of these badges.

During the part of the conference in which Jim Sinclair gave us a history of Autism Network International (ANI)—which they were a co-founder of—they talked to us about the establishment of this particular piece of assistive technology.  Basically, it was a simple idea that seemed to fit a need and quickly became very popular among many autistic spaces for it’s practicality and ease of use.

The conference it originated from is called Autreat and is held annually by ANI. This is an autism conference that accepts Autistics and Cousins (ACs)—that is, anyone diagnosed or otherwise self-identifying with any disorder autistic or similar that may share a number of autistic traits.

There was a need.  The need was met.  This is how we can safely assume most technology either emerges or becomes popular.

We also talked about something called Universal Design and the Curb-Cutter Effect.  The Curb-Cutter Effect is when something to fit a specific need is found to create convenience in a broader area than intended.  Curb cuts allowing for wheelchair accessibility to sidewalks proved to also be convenient to anyone who may have trouble with steps or even simply a mother with a baby stroller or maybe a child with a wagon.  This is a desirable outcome with disability rights advocacy as creating convenience for non-disabled people often makes the assistive technology easier to advocate for.

In this sense, these colored communication badges could serve that Curb-Cutter effect.  Not only would this be perfectly acceptable for non-disabled people to use for convenience, but would also help to increase their effectiveness and convenience for those of us who need them.  Here are a few examples:

  • Increased popularity makes the colored communication badges more easily recognizable to the general public, making them as effective outside the above-mentioned autism conferences as inside.
  • Increase in demand would create increase in supply and availability, likely making these available to pretty much anyone and even being included with, say, the name tags you are required to wear at most cons.
  • In addition to these helping people recognize the communication state of the wearer, the wearer will be able to recognize whom they can feel more comfortable to approach.
  • Increased popularity would make these badges more acceptable for public use and less alienating to those who would wear them frequently.

This is not something that we are completely incapable of surviving without; this is something that was convenient and made our lives a lot easier.  If that can be easily shared with the general public, then what purpose does it serve not to share it?

Thank you for reading.

retarded-dumb:

satanic surfers

retarded-dumb:

satanic surfers

postpunktonyabbott:

"Viva La Revolution" - The Adicts

YOOOOOOOOOOO OMG

my little sister fucked up so hard oh shit

she got caught sending nudes to some kid and talking shit about my parents and talking about how she went to a party and got drunk

SHE IS 15 GOD DAMN IT

lololollll my dad took all er shit, took her door off the frame, and she is hella grounded for like foreverrrr

damianoisfamous:

excadrill:

the look

So the internet just gave my tumblr name a whole new (literal) meaning. I was alerted to a photo of me gathering massive attention via a friend who linked me to a Reddit post titled “Don’t worry guys, I’m taking hipster to the next level.”Apparently some guy on the train uploaded this photo to twitter it has been spreading like wildfire since. Surprisingly when I read the thread on Reddit a lot of it was positive/supportive. I’m surprised by how unfazed and genuinely funny I find the negative comments. People’s theories as to why I am dressed like this, and who I really am are also really interesting. I’m dressed like this for a number reasons. Firstly, and fore-mostly, I genuinely like the clothes I am wearing. I’ve described my look as “anywhere from hipster chic to kawaii gangsta Harajuku princess”. This is the epitome of the latter. I love sailor moon, I love pink, those converse are kawaii as fuck and yeah fuck you I’m wearing Prada sunglasses. I don’t really dress like this all the time, but I wish I did more often. I mostly don’t because I want to keep the look fresh. I wore this outfit because I had an art exhibition at my college and wanted to express myself.I also find men’s fashion extremely limiting in both types of clothes, cuts of clothes and colours. Women have so many beautiful options. So I pillage their aisles a lot because I wanna look pretty.This was also a statement. As an artist I think fashion is incredibly important. This day, I wanted something that not only reflected my personality and artistic sensibilities but also have some social commentary. A lot of my work, or what I want my work to speak about, is sex and sexuality and notions of gender and gender roles. How many of you knew pink actually use to be associated with boys, not girls? Personally I think the idea of “This is a boy colour”, “This is a girl colour” or “Barbies are for girls”, “Power Rangers are for boys” is dumb as fuck. Creating social and cultural boundaries does nothing but limit the potential of a person. By dressing like this I am breaking that boundary for myself and attempting to reflect that sentiment.  

damianoisfamous:

excadrill:

the look


So the internet just gave my tumblr name a whole new (literal) meaning. I was alerted to a photo of me gathering massive attention via a friend who linked me to a Reddit post titled “Don’t worry guys, I’m taking hipster to the next level.”

Apparently some guy on the train uploaded this photo to twitter it has been spreading like wildfire since. Surprisingly when I read the thread on Reddit a lot of it was positive/supportive. I’m surprised by how unfazed and genuinely funny I find the negative comments. People’s theories as to why I am dressed like this, and who I really am are also really interesting. 

I’m dressed like this for a number reasons. Firstly, and fore-mostly, I genuinely like the clothes I am wearing. I’ve described my look as “anywhere from hipster chic to kawaii gangsta Harajuku princess”. This is the epitome of the latter. I love sailor moon, I love pink, those converse are kawaii as fuck and yeah fuck you I’m wearing Prada sunglasses. I don’t really dress like this all the time, but I wish I did more often. I mostly don’t because I want to keep the look fresh. I wore this outfit because I had an art exhibition at my college and wanted to express myself.

I also find men’s fashion extremely limiting in both types of clothes, cuts of clothes and colours. Women have so many beautiful options. So I pillage their aisles a lot because I wanna look pretty.

This was also a statement. As an artist I think fashion is incredibly important. This day, I wanted something that not only reflected my personality and artistic sensibilities but also have some social commentary. A lot of my work, or what I want my work to speak about, is sex and sexuality and notions of gender and gender roles. How many of you knew pink actually use to be associated with boys, not girls? Personally I think the idea of “This is a boy colour”, “This is a girl colour” or “Barbies are for girls”, “Power Rangers are for boys” is dumb as fuck. Creating social and cultural boundaries does nothing but limit the potential of a person. By dressing like this I am breaking that boundary for myself and attempting to reflect that sentiment.  



 Foo Fighters Saturday Night Live - Walk.

Foo Fighters Saturday Night Live - Walk.

the-mind-of-damon:

activeobserver:

heterophobicgoat:

stupidandreckless:

NOOOO NO NO NONO FUCK FUCK  FUCKIG CBS IS TELLING WOMEN NOT TO REPORT SEXUAL HARASSMENT BECAUSE IT WILL “DAMAGE THEIR CAREERS” and “HARASSMENT IS AN UNFORTUNATE PART OF CLIMBING THE LADDER” I AM SO ANGRY THEY ARE LITERALLY TURNING SEXUAL HARASSMENT INTO A NORM THIS IS NOT OKAY

This is an actual article and I’m still having a hard time believing it’s real.

"Women: don’t report when you get raped, it makes men look bad, and Men: Don’t get raped, it makes other men look bad. But instead of spending our infinite white American dollars trying to educate children and take steps towards stopping rape culture, we’re going to spend NO money and just tell you the above."

well sexual harassment was already a normal thing, we’re trying to kill it dead, but its shit like this thats taking the wind out of the sails, people trying to make it seem like anything less than what it is…fucking disgusting